08 February 2013

How To Read A Knit Chart - Lace Knitting

On 21 January 2013, I had mentioned Shawls. The beauty of the lace work, and to try something different in 2013.

Spring will be here March 20.  There so many beautiful lace pattern out there, for shawls, scarfs, wraps.  Many of them are in chart. You do not know how to read a chart.  

I have provided a YouTube video, which will show you how to read lace chart.


Part 1 Lace knitting chart:





Part 2 Lace Knitting chart:





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Chart Key:

90% of the time, a chart will come with a Chart key:
The chart key will tell you what the symbols mean.

o= yarnover
\= ssk -slip slip knit
/= k2tog - knit 2 together

/|\= sl1 k2 tog psso - slip1,  knit 2 together, take the slip stitch and slip that over the knit 2 togher.

V=slip 1 as if to purl

The black box means no stitch. This block is not to be counted into the stitches.



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This was my 1st lace Shawl:

This shawl is a chart shawl, and I had just started to learn how to read chart.  I was really surprised that I could knit something so beautiful.
Maluka





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For some reason, I  enjoy knitting leaves. It is fascinating to see how it grows in each row.

This was just a test run to see if I was going to like Frozen Leaves. 




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I am no way or claim to be an expert. I just don't want you to make the mistakes I made.  Also I know how terrifying it is to knit lace, or even read a cart.  You don't have to knit those plain boring garter stitch shawls, not unless you want to. I chose Stephen West, he makes his plain knitting garter stitch interesting by changing colors or shapes. 


Knit something beautiful and knit something lacey. Pick a pattern that you like, and do a small knit test to see if you can understand the chart, or even if you like it. Believe me I have found some patterns I like, and when I did that knit test, and start making a  small sample of it, I read the chart and understood the chart, but it did not look like the picture of the pattern, or I did keep track, I don't care how many stitch markers I use , it did just did not work.

If it sound as if I am being selfish, that I want you to convert from instructions to reading charts, then good that was my very intentions, to help you grow, and stop staying stuck. 

I was going to include a lace chart pattern. However this was to show you how to read the pattern. I don't want to suggest or put up a pattern, to say this is for beginners, that pattern might not be for you. It make seem the simplest, but if that pattern does not excite you, then it's not going to come out the way you want it to be. Pick a lace pattern that you would like to knit. That way learning how to read a lace pattern chart will be enjoyable. 

To answer your question. I prefer charts in knitting and crochet, over written instruction.

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As Always:
"You are to Beautiful to let anyone stress you out."
That raises your pressure, make you look old, and make you feel miserable. Misery loves company.

Wythlovy